By | February 4, 2018


The hard task of collecting unsafe water in Borena, southern Oromia



Borena Pastoralists extracting water from a 25 meter deep borehole

The Borena Pastoralists, part of the Oromo Nation, the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia, but which are also located in Northern Kenya, have a life that constantly revolves around one issue: water. The main way of getting water for themselves and for their prized cattle is through a deep waterhole, which the pastoralists use but say has increased in depth and difficulty to locate, nowadays because of a combination of increased population pressure and Climate Change.

Schools in Borena

Climate Change & The Negelle Accords, Part 1 of 2

This two part series describes the Negelle Peace Accord that was developed and adopted by the traditional institutions and community members of the Borana, Gari, Guji and Gabra people residing in the bordering areas of Somali and Oromia regional states. The development of the accord followed a year-long peace process among the communities after violent conflict between the Borena and Gari in early 2009 disrupted their daily life and social relations. The peace process began with training in conflict prevention and resolution for zone and woreda level government officials, elders, women, youth and religious leaders from the community representing all clans of the Oromo and Somali ethnic groups in the affected area.

A draft law was produced and in December 2009, top clan leaders, regional government officials and the established committee met in Yabello to adopt the draft. Ratification of the agreement formally adopts the peace accord by the Government of Ethiopia. This helps ensure the communities continue to uphold the agreement with the support of the government’s security and justice systems from the woreda to the regional levels.

Climate Change & The Negelle Accords, Part 2 of 2

This two part series describes the Negelle Peace Accord that was developed and adopted by the traditional institutions and community members of the Borana, Gari, Guji and Gabra people residing in the bordering areas of Somali and Oromia regional states. The development of the accord followed a year-long peace process among the communities after violent conflict between the Borena and Gari in early 2009 disrupted their daily life and social relations. The peace process began with training in conflict prevention and resolution for zone and woreda level government officials, elders, women, youth and religious leaders from the community representing all clans of the Oromo and Somali ethnic groups in the affected area.

A draft law was produced and in December 2009, top clan leaders, regional government officials and the established committee met in Yabello to adopt the draft. Ratification of the agreement formally adopts the peace accord by the Government of Ethiopia. This helps ensure the communities continue to uphold the agreement with the support of the government’s security and justice systems from the woreda to the regional levels.

Women and children from Negele and Borena pose for a photo with members from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 around the stone marker unveiled during a bridge dedication ceremony August 22, 2011. The bridge will allow the villagers to cross the river during the rainy season for school, going to the market and seeking medical treatment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Capt Jennifer Pearson)

Eleema; a Borena woman’s journey

BORANA PEOPLE: THE LARGEST OROMO PASTORALIST AND KIND PEOPLE OF EAST AFRICA “We are pastoralists today, and tomorrow we are pastoralists. Farming is an invasion,”~ Murku,Borana Tribal Elder, describing how pastoralism is their life and the manner Ethiopian govt is supporting commercial international farmers to encroach on their land.

Young girls aged between eight and eleven walk to a pond to fetch water in the Borena zone in southern Ethiopia.

Borena Zone: Borena is one of the zones of the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Borena is named after a tribe of the Oromo people.

Source: USAID Africa

For more Borena people

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